Orthodontist Near Me | Orthodontics in Ancient Times

Orthodontist Richmond

Did you know that dentistry dates back to around 400-300 BC? Hippocrates and Aristotle actually contemplated ways to straighten teeth and fix certain dental conditions. Archaeologists have found numerous mummies with what appears to be metal bands wrapped around their teeth. Researchers believe this is the first sign of ancient orthodontics put in use in attempt to straighten teeth.

Another ancient form of early orthodontics was using a “catgut”, which is a cord made of natural fibers from animal intestines. They were used in a similar fashion as wires used with braces are today – to close gaps in between teeth.

The Etruscans, a powerful and wealthy ancient civilization in Italy, actually buried their dead with dental appliances in order to maintain space and prevent collapse of the teeth for use in the afterlife. One Roman tomb was found with teeth bound by gold wire called a “ligature wire” – a small elastic wire that is used to affix the arch wire to the bracket. Even Cleopatra, the last ruler of the Kingdom of Egypt, was documented as wearing a pair of these gold brackets.

The earliest form of treatment in attempts to straighten teeth are documented to have been simple finger pressure. However, since preservation of teeth and documentation was sub-par during ancient times, most of the early research comes from the 17th century when dentistry had already begun making great advancements.

Enjoy the benefits of modern orthodontic care. Contact our office for your consultation.

Orthodontist Richmond | Orthodontics and Oral Surgery

Richmond, VA Orthodontist

Orthodontist Richmond, VAAre you planning on having orthodontic treatment? In some cases, patients may be referred to our office for oral surgery prior to starting their orthodontic treatment. Below are some of the reasons why this can occur.

You need one or more teeth extracted.

If your teeth are too crowded due to large teeth, small mouth, or other factors, your dentist or orthodontist may recommend having one or more teeth extracted. By strategically removing a few, the rest of your teeth will have the space they need to be guided into proper position by your orthodontic treatment.

You need your wisdom teeth removed.

The third molars, known as the wisdom teeth, are the last to emerge and are located in the far rear of your mouth. Before beginning orthodontic treatment, your dentist or orthodontist will review your x-rays to see whether your wisdom teeth are likely to have issues that could affect your treatment. Some of these issues include impaction, causing crowding or cracking of neighboring teeth, or shifting neighboring teeth from their proper position. If any of these are expected to occur, you may be referred to our office to have your wisdom teeth removed as a preventive measure prior to beginning your treatment.

You need corrective jaw surgery.

Major misalignment of the jaw that can benefit from corrective jaw surgery can be indicated by any of a wide range of symptoms, including:

  • Difficulty with biting, chewing, or swallowing
  • Chronic pain in head, neck, or jaw
  • Receding or protruding jaw
  • Face appearing unbalanced
  • Open bite, inability to close lips over teeth
  • Excessive wear
  • Sleep apnea and/or chronic mouth breathing
  • Birth defects and/or facial injury

If your dentist or orthodontist refers you to our office, our surgeon will work together with them to plan your treatment and follow-up care. Ensure beautiful, long-lasting orthodontic results by contacting our office for your orthodontic oral surgery needs.

Biting Off More than You Can Chew?

It is not uncommon for many of us to grab a bite to eat in a hurry. Americans have grown accustomed to bigger food portions at restaurants, but our mouths have not. Trying to fit that oversized sandwich or apple in your mouth might be worse for you than you have ever imagined. Below are some reasons why this could be detrimental for your oral health and what you can do about it.

Why This Is a Problem

According to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), taking bites that are too big for you to chew can not only cause jaw and teeth issues, it can also cause digestive problems. Discomfort, swelling and difficulty eating may result from opening your jaw too wide. Taking large bites may also result in food not being chewed thoroughly, which can lead to weight gain and digestive issues.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD)

Constantly opening your jaw too wide becomes an even larger problem for people with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The temporomandibular joint connects the jaw to the skull bones enabling movement during chewing. People with TMD, usually have a restriction with how wide they can open their jaws. Taking large bites of food, especially hard foods like apples, can aggravate this condition making pain and jaw clicking worse.

What You Can Do

If you have food that is too large to chew or starts to cause jaw discomfort, try cutting your food into smaller portions. This makes food easier to eat with less hassle. Also consider eating softer foods that won’t harm your teeth or irritate your jaw.

Tip: Avoid chewing on ice, popcorn kernels, hard candies, and opening nuts with your teeth. This can lead to a chipped tooth!

Contact our team today to schedule an exam and cleaning.

Orthodontist Richmond | Keep Kids’ Teeth Safe and Healthy This Winter

Orthodontist Near Me

Orthodontist in Richmond VAAs a parent, you want to keep your child’s teeth safe and healthy all year long. Brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits are great ways to prevent tooth decay. What you may not realize is that the colder weather of the holiday season brings its own challenges to bear. Here are some ways to help protect your child’s oral health this winter.

Encourage Water

While you may think of summer as having dangers of dehydration, winter play holds similar risks for children. The air is drier during this season than in the spring or fall. Activities such as sledding and snowball fighting can lead to sweating out fluids. Have your child sip water throughout the day. This can keep them hydrated and prevent dry mouth, which can raise risk of tooth decay.

Mouth Guard

Whether your child enjoys skiing, sledding, skating, or snowball fights, winter brings increased risks of falls and injuries to both mouth and face. According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), up to 40% of kids’ dental injuries occur during sports. Having your child wear a mouth guard during these activities can greatly reduce their risk of damaging teeth or gums.

Strong Hygiene

Regular brushing and flossing are crucial to keeping teeth healthy. If your child becomes ill with a cold or flu virus, continuing dental hygiene can help their immune system concentrate on getting well. If your child vomits, have them rinse their mouth with water right away to avoid leaving acids on their teeth. Discard and replace your child’s toothbrush once they are well to prevent re-infection.

Limit Sugar

Cold weather can lead to sniffles and coughs. Avoid bathing your child’s teeth in sugar from cough drops. Choose sugar-free options to soothe sore throats. Limit juice and cocoa that have high sugar content. Monitor your child’s candy intake through the holidays and ensure they brush after indulging.

Don’t Share

While sharing toys and books is a habit to encourage, sharing cups or silverware is not. Tooth decay, cold sores, and other oral ailments can be spread through saliva. Make sure each family member is using their own drink, spoon, and fork.

For more ways you can keep your child’s teeth safe through the winter season, contact our office.